Very unique...yet another irritation! by Bernard (Page 2 of 3)

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Ragman
PaulT wrote:.......an Angry Section might upset Zeb who just wants to be mellow



oh an angry section, can we, can we, oh go on plleeeeaaaasssseeee

Posted 29 Jan 2012, 00:28 #21 


PaulT
I think eBay is the big eye opener - school teaching must have changed greatly since my days. It would seem that spelling and grammar are extinct and with some feel that I need a translation dictionary to decipher some of the descriptions.

They then complain that the number of 'youfs' unemployed is high - zombies seem to have more intelligence and more employable than some of the future generation.......

....think the angry thread is well under way
Paul

That apart Mrs Lincoln, did you enjoy the play

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Posted 29 Jan 2012, 06:53 #22 

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Dave
geesmith wrote:Yes, I'm old enough to have had old English lessons.


Is that old English lessons, or Ye Olde English lessons....? :gmc:

Posted 29 Jan 2012, 10:10 #23 

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Bermudan 75
Dave wrote:
geesmith wrote:Yes, I'm old enough to have had old English lessons.


Is that old English lessons, or Ye Olde English lessons....? :gmc:


I had both, did 'O' Level English Lanaguage and then part of my 'A' Level English Literature included studying Chaucer. Now that is Ye Olde English, the only bit I remember is wolso noldo woldo or something similar which means: willy nilly. :roll:
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Posted 29 Jan 2012, 10:25 #24 

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geesmith
Dave wrote:
geesmith wrote:Yes, I'm old enough to have had old English lessons.


Is that old English lessons, or Ye Olde English lessons....? :gmc:


Remind me to pike oot my bonny blue een. I obviously trusted spellcheck.


A conversation with my English teacher and myself..

Him " whatcha doing with that pen boy?"

Me (bemused-no pen in sight) "Pen sir? What pen?"

Him (excitedly and a tad impatiently) "Pin? Pin? Whatcha mean what pin?"

Me "I don't have a pen sir"

Him "...and which lesson are you in?"

Me " English sir"

Him " Correct, so wouldn't it be which pen sir?"?

Callaghan (typically) " sir, has a witch got Smith's pen?"

Him " Callaghan, go and see the Headmaster and tell him I sent you "

Quiet resumes until Callaghan returns with three red welts across his palm whereupon even quieter resumes.




footnote " I didn't have no pen "

Posted 29 Jan 2012, 11:53 #25 


carlpenn
Wots up wiv ya all? Dow U like the way we tlk and txt?

I didn't do very well at GCSE English :p
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Posted 30 Jan 2012, 21:04 #26 

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Jürgen
carlpenn wrote:Wots up wiv ya all? Dow U like the way we tlk and txt?

:scared:
Jürgen

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Posted 30 Jan 2012, 21:12 #27 

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Duncan
I agree with so much of this, and while I agree with many of the rants, we need to be careful.

I think the differences in spelling between us and those across the lake was actually caused by us changing the way we spelled words after they had left these shores, and them not keeping up with it. For example color / colour. Apparently we started to add the redundant U to many words as a kind of affectation. A bit like text speak it became the language.
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Posted 30 Jan 2012, 21:13 #28 

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Jürgen
Duncan wrote:I think the differences in spelling between us and those across the lake was actually caused by us changing the way we spelled words after they had left these shores, and them not keeping up with it.

So who has been responsible for the cost cutting measures, resulting in not sending ambassadors to tell them?

;) :gmc:
Jürgen

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Posted 30 Jan 2012, 21:24 #29 

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Duncan
Jürgen wrote:So who has been responsible for the cost cutting measures, resulting in not sending ambassadors to tell them?

;) :gmc:


Err, surely it's well known how much notice the US takes of the UK?
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Posted 30 Jan 2012, 21:31 #30 

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Jürgen
Duncan wrote:Err, surely it's well known how much notice the US takes of the UK?

You can't blame them, as their news media pretty much never report on news from outside the US. For example look at their many "World Series" sporting events ... :lol:
Jürgen

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Posted 30 Jan 2012, 21:45 #31 

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Zeb
T'is a living language chaps....it'll change as time goes on no matter how much one rants aout it all..:D 'Very unique' lovely phrase, completely meaningless as Bernard has pointed out. You cannot intensify or reinforce an absolute.....just like God isn't 'very omnipotent'...:)

Btw...the standard of English teaching is generally very high....the standard of learning amongst the little darlings may however not always match this..:)

Posted 30 Jan 2012, 22:39 #32 

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Bermudan 75
Jürgen wrote:
Duncan wrote:I think the differences in spelling between us and those across the lake was actually caused by us changing the way we spelled words after they had left these shores, and them not keeping up with it.

So who has been responsible for the cost cutting measures, resulting in not sending ambassadors to tell them?

;) :gmc:


The American War of Independance.......and the re-writing of the English Dictionary, in the 1800s, that saw many old English words given a slight French flavour.
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Posted 31 Jan 2012, 00:05 #33 

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Ragman
Zeb wrote:T'is a living language chaps....it'll change as time goes on no matter how much one rants aout it all..:D 'Very unique' lovely phrase, completely meaningless as Bernard has pointed out. You cannot intensify or reinforce an absolute.....just like God isn't 'very omnipotent'...:)

Btw...the standard of English teaching is generally very high....the standard of learning amongst the little darlings may however not always match this..:)


Listening to the way the language is used by many these days, I've say it's a dying language

Posted 31 Jan 2012, 00:09 #34 

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Zeb
Ragman wrote:
Zeb wrote:T'is a living language chaps....it'll change as time goes on no matter how much one rants aout it all..:D 'Very unique' lovely phrase, completely meaningless as Bernard has pointed out. You cannot intensify or reinforce an absolute.....just like God isn't 'very omnipotent'...:)

Btw...the standard of English teaching is generally very high....the standard of learning amongst the little darlings may however not always match this..:)


Listening to the way the language is used by many these days, I've say it's a dying language



Ok, maybe more accurate to say it is an 'evolving' language....and as we know,evolution doesn't always get it right...:)

Posted 31 Jan 2012, 08:03 #35 

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MGBev
I must agree with you all. I especially hate it when you are reading a novel, printed in the UK and they spell american, like realize and not realise, that sooo bugs me. But other words like colour are spelt right so what's going on??? grrrr!! Computers are to blame for that, they are American English unless you change it UK English.

Posted 31 Jan 2012, 11:27 #36 

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Dave
MGBev wrote:I must agree with you all. I especially hate it when you are reading a novel, printed in the UK and they spell american, like realize and not realise


That's a good point!

We occasionally buy a dog magazine, Your Dog if I recall correctly, and they always use a Z where there should be an S. It got so annoying that I wrote to them to complain (:grumpyoldman:) but they never wrote back!

(btw, this is an English magazine for the English market, published in Stamford, about thirty miles from here!)

Posted 31 Jan 2012, 13:06 #37 


PaulT
Dave wrote:
MGBev wrote:I must agree with you all. I especially hate it when you are reading a novel, printed in the UK and they spell american, like realize and not realise


That's a good point!

We occasionally buy a dog magazine, Your Dog if I recall correctly, and they always use a Z where there should be an S. It got so annoying that I wrote to them to complain (:grumpyoldman:) but they never wrote back!

(btw, this is an English magazine for the English market, published in Stamford, about thirty miles from here!)


You will find a little debate here:

http://www.englishforums.com/English/To ... q/post.htm
Paul

That apart Mrs Lincoln, did you enjoy the play

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Posted 31 Jan 2012, 14:01 #38 

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Dave
Interesting debate there!

For some reason, it's remind me of another peeve...

Someone addicted to alcohol is an alcoholic. Fair enough. Then we had "chocoholic" for years, which wasn't! Now the "oholic" suffix has crept in for all sorts of things; workoholic, shopoholic etc

Surely they should just be adding the "ic" suffix (or something else) as, by including the "ohol" bit, they are nicking this off "alcohol", which has no relevance to the addiction in question!

:mrgreen:

Posted 31 Jan 2012, 14:23 #39 

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Mick
(Site Admin)
As long as we understand what is being said/written I don't have a problem. Not everybody has the same level of education or the capacity to be educated. This is not a fault, just facts of life. No excuses for those writing for a living though.

Did I really right dat? Must be in a gud moode or summat. :D

Posted 31 Jan 2012, 15:48 #40 


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