Urban foxes by Dave Goody

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Dave Goody
As someone who lives in a small village, 5o yds from farmland/woodland. I feed a tame fox that almost takes food from my hand and comes when called. Also several badgers. I am a little bit perturbed by the hysteria about the recent "Fox bit my babies finger off saga". I realise that in cities they have become a bit of a pest but anyone have any views?

Posted 13 Feb 2013, 12:11 #1 

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Bermudan 75
We have encroached onto their territory, I have no problem with them. Stray / uncontrolled dogs are a bigger problem.
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Posted 13 Feb 2013, 12:14 #2 

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MrDoodles
Sorry, but as it's "Townies" who have shouted the most and had Fox Hunting banned, I say that you reep what you sow!
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Posted 13 Feb 2013, 12:53 #3 


Dave Goody
The daft thing is, I can only remember 2 cases of foxes attacking humans in my life [including this one]. We do hear almost daily occurrences of Bull Terrier crosses attacking children/adults with even death resulting.
I find the story of the baby attack strange? A 4 week old baby in a room with the house door wide open in freezing temperatures. Baby taken from cot, were the sides not up? All very strange. Forget the fox, some loony with a knife could have entered the house?
Dave

Posted 13 Feb 2013, 13:05 #4 

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Mick
(Site Admin)
They can be a pest in some built up areas, however, it's our rubbish that attracted them in the first instance. Cut out the filth that the human race trails behind it and the foxes and other furry friends will die out or go elsewhere.

Posted 13 Feb 2013, 13:22 #5 


Jumper
Some of us see the fox as a cuddly soft toy. Brian May comes to mind on that sickly TV show where he played with a cub on his knee and made coo-chi-coo noises to it. I would think he had more people laughing at him, a rather sad change for him, than had applauded him for his musicality.

They aren’t pets or toys, will never be domesticated, and will always attack if they feel threatened or are hungry; and they are always hungry. It’s not “their fault”, it’s their nature. Brian May would never allow an adult fox to be in the bedroom of any child of his! They are essentially wild animals.

The cause of their urban proliferation lies in the disgusting behaviour of humans in leaving and throwing away so much food in public places and providing twilight banquets where the young can learn all about urban survival. In the countryside there is sufficient other wild life for them to survive on without overpopulation or encroaching on humans (except where there are chickens of course!). If an area is devoid of wild life, then the fox goes elsewhere where the living is easy. The only way to improve is to control rubbish disposal and there are other countries where rubbish is collected daily!

I think the shouting of the city dwellers is, far from being part of the politically motivated hue and cry (no pun intended), entirely justified and is directed at the collective failure of successive administrations, with all kinds of coloured bushy tails, to accept that the public have a right to expect adequate social services.

Posted 13 Feb 2013, 14:11 #6 


carlpenn
Dave Goody wrote:The daft thing is, I can only remember 2 cases of foxes attacking humans in my life [including this one]. We do hear almost daily occurrences of Bull Terrier crosses attacking children/adults with even death resulting.
I find the story of the baby attack strange? A 4 week old baby in a room with the house door wide open in freezing temperatures. Baby taken from cot, were the sides not up? All very strange. Forget the fox, some loony with a knife could have entered the house?
Dave


I read the Door was shut, but had a faulty lock? The Fox then invited himself through the Door and made its way to the Babies Room.

There was an article the other day as apparently "Internet Trolls" spammed a Twitter site or something similar making suggestions that it was in fact the Family (or Family Friends) pet Dog that attacked the Child, not a Fox, and that the Family said it was a Fox to protect the Dog from being Terminated.

I used the "" on Internet Trolls, as it has become apparent, that whenever someone voices opinion on the Net, that some do not like, they are called Trolls.
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Posted 14 Feb 2013, 21:29 #7 


Dave Goody
Jumper wrote:Some of us see the fox as a cuddly soft toy. Brian May comes to mind on that sickly TV show where he played with a cub on his knee and made coo-chi-coo noises to it. I would think he had more people laughing at him, a rather sad change for him, than had applauded him for his musicality.

They aren’t pets or toys, will never be domesticated, and will always attack if they feel threatened or are hungry; and they are always hungry. It’s not “their fault”, it’s their nature. Brian May would never allow an adult fox to be in the bedroom of any child of his! They are essentially wild animals.

The cause of their urban proliferation lies in the disgusting behaviour of humans in leaving and throwing away so much food in public places and providing twilight banquets where the young can learn all about urban survival. In the countryside there is sufficient other wild life for them to survive on without overpopulation or encroaching on humans (except where there are chickens of course!). If an area is devoid of wild life, then the fox goes elsewhere where the living is easy. The only way to improve is to control rubbish disposal and there are other countries where rubbish is collected daily!
I think the shouting of the city dwellers is, far from being part of the politically motivated hue and cry (no pun intended), entirely justified and is directed at the collective failure of successive administrations, with all kinds of coloured bushy tails, to accept that the public have a right to expect adequate social services.


I agree with most of this, although dont forget most of our domestic animals like dogs were originally wild [some still are] On TV today I heard that in the last 5 years 7 people including 5 kids died as a result of dog attacks virtually all from attacks by Bull terrier Xs. Strangely no foxes! Basically in Urban areas people should get up a few minutes earlier and put their rubbish out in the morning rather than leaving it out all night to allow scavengers to rip the bags apart.
I'm no tree hugger, from 16 onwards [now 64] I was a shooting man and have shot dozens of foxes. Over the last few years I have changed a lot of my views and no longer have any urge to hurt any animals. We have a 7 year old grandson living with us who wants a puppy and I thought why not a rescue one? I have trawled all the RSPCA and Dogs Trust and local shelters and guess what dogs are available? Yes dozens of the breed mentioned above! Certainly very few that you would want to play with a child. A fox would be safer!
I guess we will have to invest in my old favourite a Labrador. Dave

Posted 15 Feb 2013, 14:31 #8 

Last edited by Dave Goody on 15 Feb 2013, 14:52, edited 1 time in total.

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stevemac
As a poultry keeper I say, kill em, kill em all ;)
Steve
People call me average, but I think that's mean!
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Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day; teach a man to fish and he will eat for a lifetime; give a man religion and he will die praying for a fish.

Posted 15 Feb 2013, 14:39 #9 


Jumper
Dave Goody wrote: from 16 onwards [now 64] I was a shooting man and have shot dozens of foxes.


I saw what seems to be a simple and apt suggestion in the paper today Dave. I assume you had to have a gun licence for the above as it was a dangerous weapon. Some gent proposed that certain dogs could be seen as such and are currently unlicensed for anything. He went on to say that the owners of such animals, indeed any animals if you take the welfare of the animal into account, may represent more of a danger than the dog and therefore they should apply for a personal licence to own one. Seems reasonable to me, a non-owner/keeper.

Posted 16 Feb 2013, 15:33 #10 


Dave Goody
and anyone with the combination of shaven head, tatoos and the urge to dress the animal in a studded harness should be banned from holding the said licence

Posted 16 Feb 2013, 18:23 #11 


Jumper
Er.... steady on Dave. That's two out of three for me there.

Posted 16 Feb 2013, 19:18 #12 


Dave Goody
Jumper wrote:Er.... steady on Dave. That's two out of three for me there.


2 out of 3 aint bad :-D

Posted 17 Feb 2013, 14:09 #13 


Jumper
I deny any knowledge of a studded harness your 'onour. Just because he answers to the name of Tarquin.....

Posted 17 Feb 2013, 16:20 #14 


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